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News Headlines
New Horizons spacecraft still on track for Pluto flyby
The New Horizons spacecraft is still on track for its historic July 14 flyby of Pluto despite experiencing a technical glitch Saturday. In a statement released Sunday NASA said that New Horizons will resume normal science opera
Sawfish Have Virgin Births: First in the Wild
he first known virgin births in the wild have been documented among critically endangered smalltooth sawfish in Florida waters. The discovery, reported in the journal Current Biology, marks the first time that living offspring fro
UW Men's Rowing Makes History
The Washington Huskies men’s crew team swept into the record books Sunday by winning their fifth-straight national championship, becoming the first collegiate team to do so in the storied history of the sport.he UW men’s varsity e
New NASA images may solve Ceres 'bright spot' puzzle
series of new NASA images may explain the unusual bright spots on dwarf planet Ceres that have been puzzling scientists. The closest-yet images of Ceres were taken by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft on May 3 and 4 from a distance of 8,400
Many dead after another powerful earthquake hits Nepal
At least 48 people have died and another 1,261 have been injured in Nepal due to the latest large earthquake there, said Nepalese government spokesman Minendra Rijal. Thirty-two of the Asian nation's 75 districts were affected.
Wind Power Without The Mills
Vortex Bladeless is a radical company. It wants to completely change the way we get energy from the wind. Think wind stick instead of a massive tower with blades that capture blowing winds. Wind stick. Really. Lest you think I’
Dutch Polar Explorers Likely Drown in Arctic
Two Dutch explorers studying melting Arctic sea ice have apparently drowned after falling through thin ice, police said Monday. Marc Cornelissen and Philip de Roo were last seen on April 6 heading north on skis from Resolute — Can
Massive Mississippi Floods May Have Wiped Out Ancient Civilization
Massive floods in the Mississippi River valley may have wiped out an ancient civilization, according to a new study. Cahokia were the largest prehistoric settlement in the Americas north of Mexico until the year 1200 AD, when the
Giant whales have unique nerves like a bungee cords, researchers say
Rorqual whales have a unique nerve structure in their mouths and tongues that can double in length and recoil like a bungee cord, University of British Columbia, or UBC, researchers said in an article published in Current Biology.
Lava Lake On Kilauea Volcano Is Seriously Close To Overflowing
A lava lake on Hawaii's Big Island is mere feet from overflowing. As of Monday morning, the lava's surface was within seven feet of the lake's rim, the highest it's been since the current eruption began in 2008. "Magma is risin
A Resupply Mission in Trouble, are Astronauts?
The six astronauts aboard the International Space Station are having a little trouble getting new supplies.An uncrewed Russian cargo capsule carrying 6,000 pounds of food and other supplies for the space station is currently spinn
Saltwater discovered in Antarctica supports possibility of life on Mars
Scientists have discovered a saltwater network 1,000 feet below an ice-free region in Antarctica, and its implications are, literally, out of this world. If life-supporting aquifers can exist in Antarctica, there's a good possibil
Global warming to blame for most heat extremes - study
Global warming is to blame for most extreme hot days and almost a fifth of heavy downpours, according to a scientific study on Monday that gives new evidence of how rising man-made greenhouse gases are skewing the weather. "Alr
7-year-old boy discovers new species of dinosaur
Bringing your kids to work has its benefits. Seven-year-old Diego Suarez was playing outside with his sister while his parents, both geologists, studied rock formations in the Andes in southern Chile. As they were playing, Suarez
Officials: Death toll from Nepal earthquake has surpassed 4,000
Shelter, fuel, food, medicine, power, news, workers — Nepal's earthquake-hit capital was short on everything Monday as its people searched for lost loved ones, sorted through rubble for their belongings and struggled to provide fo
Florida's Christ of the Abyss: Photos
The first underwater park in the United States is home to a fascinating piece of art with origins in Italy. Off the Florida Keys, a 2,000 pound statue of Jesus Christ sits on the ocean floor in John Pennekamp Coral Reef State P
Iceberg Will Be Home to Italian Adventurer for a Year
You may remember that in March, we introduced you to two intrepid Cleveland men who decided to camp overnight on frozen-solid Lake Erie, and had pictures to prove it. But that crazy stunt seems almost mundane compared to the feat
English Channel Crossing Record Confirmed
The World Sailing Speed Record Council has ratified the establishment of a new Cowes (GBR) to Dinard (FRA) outright record. The 105-ft trimaran Lending Club, sailed by Renaud La Planche (USA/FRA), Ryan Breymaier (USA), and a crew
Why Does an Octopus Walk Funny?
Octopuses move with a simple elegance, but they have no rhythm, according to new research. Each of an octopus's eight arms is soft, flexible and muscular, and acts as if it has an infinite number of joints, said the study's lead a
Walking improves health outcomes for prostate cancer survivors
Those who best prostate cancer don't come out of the battle unscathed. As is the case for most cancers, the treatment for prostate cancer can be taxing on a patient's health. But according to new research, something as simple as
Too Much Carbon Dioxide May Have Caused Earth’s Worst Mass Extinction
So much for carbon dioxide being a “harmless” gas.The worst mass extinction in Earth’s history may have been caused by huge amounts of carbon dioxide that accumulated in the atmosphere and the ocean after colossal volcanic eruptio
Rare sperm whale caught on tape
The Gulf exploration crew that made headlines in 2014 for spotting ghost sharks, dumbo octopuses, vampire squids from hell, a sunken Nazi war boat and other oddities has made its first big discovery of a new season at sea. This
Prehistoric Bone-Devouring Worms Fed on Carcasses of Plesiosaurs
Osedax worms, also known as bone worms, zombie worms, or bone-eating worms, were first discovered on a whale carcass in 2002. There are more than 10 species that can be found in oceans across the globe at depths of up to 4 km.
Nine Hundred Percent Over Budget
With the 25th anniversary of the Hubble Space Telescope next week, people are again thinking about its big successor. The very first month that this part of Science 2.0, the communications portal, went live, in January of 2007, we
CU-Boulder scientists, colleagues probe methane emission mystery in Four Corners region
This is a joint release of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and the Institute for Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU-Boulder), NOAA, NASA and the
The Pacific Ocean may have entered a new warm phase — and the consequences could be dramatic
Two new studies have just hit about the “warm blob” in the northeast Pacific ocean — a 2 degree C or more temperature anomaly that began in the winter of 2013-2014 in the Gulf of Alaska and later expanded. Scientists have been ast
Attempting To Demystify Lake Erie Algal Bloom
Researchers from the University of Michigan are working relentlessly to understand toxicity of the algal bloom in Lake Erie. There have been ongoing efforts for the reduction of phosphorus, along with other nutrients, from being w
Italian Espresso Machine Headed for Space Station
The next space station grocery run will carry caffeine to a whole new level: Aboard the SpaceX supply ship is an authentic espresso machine straight from Italy. SpaceX is scheduled to launch its unmanned rocket with the espress
UCD archaeologists seek to recreate the world of our ancestors
How did our ancestors create the world they lived in? How did they survive without the modern accoutrements that make our lives easy? The question is at the heart of archaeology and forms the basis of a unique project in a quiet c
Antarctic ice shelves rapidly thinning
A new study led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the Univ. of California, San Diego (UC San Diego) researchers has revealed that the thickness of Antarctica’s floating ice shelves has recently decreased by as much as 18 p
New Window to Change Color with Weather
eather could power the next generation of smart windows. Researchers have created glass that tints by harvesting energy from wind and precipitation. The approach offers an alternative to other smart windows powered by batteries, s
Sailing for Novices Often Begins With Invitations to Crew
Spencer Raggio's affair with sailing began on Boston Harbor aboard a sloop he chartered with a girlfriend late one August afternoon. There was some breeze early. A four-hour sail turned into seven hours. They passed sunset and
Mars rover Curiosity spots strange
Climbing up Mt. Sharp in the middle of Gale Crater, NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has discovered two-tone veins of minerals that reveal multiple episodes of water flowing through rock — even after the lake that once filled the botto
New Study:Tasmanian Swift Parrot is on Brink of Extinction
The swift parrot is the only recognized species of the genus Lathamus. It is a slim, medium-sized parrot about 25 cm long. It weighs about 65 g and has a wingspan of between 32 and 36 cm. It is bright green with red around the
Archaeologists Unearth Ottoman War Camel in Austria
“The partly excavated skeleton was at first suspected to be a large horse or cattle. But one look at the cervical vertebrae, the lower jaw and the metacarpal bones immediately revealed that this was a camel,” said Dr Galik, who is
New 2015 Safety Protocol for Everest
For the first 28 years of Everest exploration, starting in 1922, the Nepalese side of the mountain was off-limits; climbers launched their attempts from the Tibetan side. Once the Nepalese government opened the mountain to climber
Rio Mayor: Olympic sailing venues, won't be clean
There’s something rotten off the coast of Rio and unfortunately for those participating in next year’s Olympic sailing events, they’ll likely have to compete in it. Rio’s Mayor Eduardo Paes confirmed to Brazil’s SporTV that Guanab
Space Shuttle Alarm Forces Relocation
A possible leak in the cooling system on the International Space Station has resulted in the evacuation of the U.S. crew from the American segment of the station to the Russian segment, NASA said Wednesday. The U.S. astronauts
Can Humans Survive Climate Change?
Although most of us worry about other things, climate scientists have become increasingly worried about the survival of civilization. For example, Lonnie Thompson, who received the U.S. National Medal of Science in 2010, said that
Should tourists be banned from Antarctica?
This season around 37,000 tourists are expected to visit Antarctica - home to about 20 million pairs of breeding penguins. But is it ethically acceptable to go on holiday to such a pristine environment? Enfolded in two glacial
Mars has gas, and Curiosity finds organic matter -- fuzzy signs of life?
It could be a sign, a vague one. A NASA rover has found the building blocks of life on Mars. They might be the product of past or present life on the Red Planet -- or they might not be. Either way, the samples of organic matte
Bizarre Russian rock contains 30,000 diamonds
Here's the perfect Christmas gift for the person who has everything: A red and green rock, ornament-sized, stuffed with 30,000 teeny-tiny diamonds. The sparkly chunk was pulled from Russia's huge Udachnaya diamond mine and donated
Royal Entryway Discovered at Herod’s Palace
A monumental entryway to the Herodian Hilltop Palace at Herodium National Park has been unearthed by a team from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The entryway features a complex system of arches spanning its width on three sepa
Will Pacific Crest Trail be the same after ‘Wild’?
Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) advocates say the book “Wild,” now a movie of the same name, has been a good thing for the 2,650-mile trail — mostly. Liz Bergeron, director of the nonprofit Pacific Crest Trail Association (www.pcta.
7,500-Year-Old Well Excavated at an Underwater Site
A fresh-water well in the submerged Neolithic site of Kfar Samir in Israel is being investigated by a team including Ehud Galili of the Israel Antiquities Authority and the University of Haifa, and Jonathan Benjamin of Flinders Un
How the wind farms of the future could be underwater
The United Kingdom may seem an unlikely candidate to lead a renewable energy revolution; it doesn't have much sun for solar power, it doesn't have much space for wind power and it doesn't have giant coursing rivers for hydro.
Activists: Eilat Oil Leak an 'Environmental Disaster'
Environmental activists have declared an “environmental disaster” in Israel's Arava desert, after thousands of cubic meters of crude oil spilled out from a leaking pipeline overnight Tuesday. The leak, about 20 kilometers north of
Ability to consume alcohol may have shaped primate evolution
Craving a stiff drink after the holiday weekend? Your desire to consume alcohol, as well as your body’s ability to break down the ethanol that makes you tipsy, dates back about 10 million years, researchers have discovered. The ne
Primitive form of navigation found in fruit bats
Old World fruit bats can’t use sound to navigate, an ability known as echolocation that’s found in all other bats. At least that’s what scientists thought. But a new study reveals that these bats can indeed echolocate; instead of
Etchings on a 500,000-year-old shell appear to have been made by human ancestor
In 2007, Stephen Munro got the shock of his life. The archaeology graduate student was studying mollusk shells gathered more than 100 years ago on the Indonesian island of Java, where an early human ancestor, Homo erectus, had roa
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Latest News
Soyuz capsule docks with International Space Station
A Soyuz space capsule carrying astronauts from Russia, Japan and the United States has docked with the International Spa...-The Seattle Times: Home
Promiscuity may help some corals survive bleaching events
Researchers have shown for the first time that some corals surviving bleaching events can acquire and host new types of ...-ScienceDaily: Latest Science N
Wolf poaching: Hunters should realize that wolves help ecosystems
Much praise to Op-Ed writer Chase Gunnell for sticking up for the wolves. Here’s a standup a guy I’d rather hunt with t...-The Seattle Times
Volcanic eruptions: How bubbles lead to disaster
Why are volcanologists interested in vapor bubbles? Because they can accumulate in a magma reservoir underneath a volcan...-ScienceDaily: Latest Science N
Visit 7 national parks and monuments in Colorado for free April 16-24
More than 400 national parks and monuments — including four in Colorado — will offer free admission April 16-24 as part...-Denver Post: Outdoors
Gran and dog survived nine days in wild by drinking pond water and eating desert plants
Ann Rodgers, 72, and her pet pooch were eventually found in the White Mountains of Arizona after she wrote "help" on the...-mirror.co.uk - Home - News
Ant Evolves Flashy Way to Beat Desert Heat
A desert ant survives temperatures that can kill other insects and animals with a unique system that is effective, and c...-Discovery News - Top Stories
Bible Was Written Earlier, Ancient Notes Suggest
Ancient correspondence written on pottery shards suggests when and where the earliest texts of the Bible were created....-Discovery News - Top Stories
Planets stripped bare by host stars
Astronomers have defined a class of planet that have had their atmospheres stripped away by their host stars. ...-BBC News | News Front Page | W
Stephen Hawking to Unveil New Space Exploration Project Tuesday
Stephen Hawking will announce a mysterious new space exploration initiative Tuesday, and there's plenty of reason to thi...-SPACE.com
Astronomers discover mysterious alignment of black holes
Deep radio imaging has revealed that supermassive black holes in a region of the distant universe are all spinning out r...-ScienceDaily: Latest Science N
Ancient Mars bombardment likely enhanced life-supporting habitat
The bombardment of Mars some 4 billion years ago by comets and asteroids as large as West Virginia likely enhanced clima...-ScienceDaily: Latest Science N
Controversial Dark Matter Claim Faces Ultimate Test
Multiple teams finally have the material they need to repeat an enigmatic experiment...-Scientific American
Bats Hear Just Fine, Despite Noisy Lives
Prolonged exposure to intense sound levels doesn't harm their hearing, a new study finds....-Discovery News - Top Stories
Geologists To Drill Into Heart of Dinosaur-Killing Impact
Quest aims to uncover secrets of big craters across the Solar System....-Scientific American
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