Expedition Newsnet searches over 18,000 articles per week to bring you the latest adventures, field research reports, and expeditionary news from around the globe. ExpeditionQuest members have access to full text articles and our weekly e-mail service.
News Headlines
Revised Antarctic Sanctuary
Australia said Monday it was hopeful of winning support for its plan to create a vast marine reserve off Antarctica, after revising the proposal to make it smaller. Australia, France and the European Union first put forward a b
To the Moon and Back: China Tests Space Program
Up, up and away. Way away -- to the moon, in fact. China launched an experimental spacecraft early Friday that is scheduled to orbit the moon before returning to Earth, a first for the country's ambitious space program and conside
New Generation Takes on Ancient Egypt
Five years ago, if archaeologists digging up pharaonic ruins in Egypt found any human bones, they would usually throw them away. “Most Egyptian archaeological missions looked at human remains as garbage,” said Afaf Wahba, a young
WWII German U-Boat Recovered
A World War II German U-boat, sunk during the Battle of the Atlantic more than 72 years ago, has been discovered off the coast of North Carolina, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Tuesday. The Germa
Seattle's Suburban Airport
The Navy needed an airport, and by being in the upper left corner of the country, Seattle was a natural place for it. They found a site out of town, and Seattle had one of its first airports. Nope, not Sea-Tac. Not Boeing Field, e
Finding Fracking Fluids In The Environment
New geochemical tracers can identify any hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids that could have spilled into the environment, according to field tests at a spill site in West Virginia and downstream from an oil and gas brine wastewa
Lakes Around the World Are Rapidly Disappearing
A few days ago, NASA posted startling satellite pictures of the Aral Sea in Central Asia, once the fourth biggest lake on the planet, which over the past 50 years has been virtually drained as a result of an ill-advised Soviet-era
Angry, Rolling Cloud Is First New Type in 60 Years
Undulatus asperatus isn’t some obscure anatomical structure next to your peritoneum, nor is it a minor character from the movie "Gladiator." No, it’s actually a type of cloud formation that weather fanciers have proposed for in
Possible Landing Sites Selected for Europe's ExoMars
European space officials are eyeing four possible landing sites on Mars for a life-seeking rover set to launch toward the Red Planet in 2018. All of the potential ExoMars rover landing sites are located near the Red Planet's equat
167,000 Kinds of Microbes Live in NYC's Central Park
When you think of a place teeming with life forms, you usually think of the Amazon rainforest or some other wilderness. But Manhattan’s Central Park, located in the midst of the nation’s most densely populated city with 27,000 peo
Fish failing to adapt to rising carbon dioxide levels in ocean
Rising carbon dioxide levels in oceans adversely change the behaviour of fish through generations, raising the possibility that marine species may never fully adapt to their changed environment, research has found. The study, p
The mystery of the ancient shipwreck
In the azure waters off the rocky coast of Antikythera, a remote island in the Mediterranean with a population of less than 50, lies one of the most mysterious shipwrecks of all time. In 1900, sponge divers from the Greek isla
Ground Zero for HIV/AIDS Identified
The deadly virus responsible for the global HIV/AIDS pandemic emerged around 1920 in the city of Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, according to new research that has relevance to the effort to understa
Marble Door Revealed in Greek Tomb
Archaeologists excavating the large and mysterious mound at the Kasta Hill site at Amphipolis, Greece, have unearthed a broken marble door, Greece’s Culture Ministry announced today. Made from marble brought from the island of
Beautiful View of the Wild Duck Star Cluster in Flight
A spectacular new photo shows a cluster of stars whose brightest objects form a triangle that has been likened to a flock of ducks in flight. The European Southern Observatory's La Silla Observatory in Chile captured the beauti
Cargo Ship Is First to Solo the Northwest Passage
Another Arctic milestone was reached this week when a cargo ship fortified against ice completed a solo trip through the hazardous Northwest Passage. The MV Nunavik, owned by shipping firm Fednav and built in Japan, left Canada
'Bolt from the Blue' Caught on Camera
Lighting can strike the ground miles away from the towering thunderstorms that produce it, a phenomenon called a "bolt from the blue." A high-speed camera run by the University of Florida's Lightning Research Laboratory caught
Titan's Polar Vortex is Packed with Toxic Cyanide
Since NASA’s Cassini mission discovered the swirling polar vortex in Saturn’s moon Titan’s atmosphere, scientists have been fascinated by this apparently seasonal phenomenon. Now, scientists analyzing Cassini data have found that
cancer sufferer embarks on inspirational sailing trip
A young cancer sufferer from Treharris took part in an inspirational sailing trip with the Ellen MacArthur Cancer Trust. Thomas Harman, 11, joined the voyage along with 16 other youngsters between the age of eight of 18 who are in
Around the Pier
Octavio Aburto-Oropeza, marine biologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, has always had a dream of catching science up to the speed of communication. “Nowadays, how fast is communication happening? Inst
US reroutes flights to avoid walrus stampede on Alaska beach
The plight of thousands of walruses forced to crowd on to an Alaska beach because of disappearing sea ice has set off an all-out response from the US government to avoid a catastrophic stampede. The Federal Aviation Authority h
Dying brain cells cue new brain cells to grow in songbird
Brain cells that multiply to help birds sing their best during breeding season are known to die back naturally later in the year. For the first time researchers have described the series of events that cues new neuron growth each
Canoe & Climate Shed Light on Polynesian Sailing Technology
Two new studies published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shed light on how Polynesian seafarers colonized the islands of the Pacific Ocean. Lead author Dilys Amanda Johns of the University of Auckland descr
Return to the Antikythera Shipwreck: Marine Archaeology Goes High-Tech
The yellow, torpedo-shaped vehicles glided through the clear Mediterranean water just 10 feet above the 2,000-year-old shipwreck on the bottom. During the weekend of September 20 the autonomous underwater vehicles made 40 long pas
Kilian Jornet & Emelie Forsberg’s mountain epic
Kilian Jornet and Emelie Forsberg are two of the most talented and passionate mountain runners ever to grace the sport. And now they have turned their hands (and feet) to organising their own event, creating a truly unique event i
Tiny Sea Monkeys Create Giant Ocean Currents
Every evening, sunset signals the start of dinner for billions of wiggling sea monkeys living in the ocean. As these sea monkeys — which are not actually monkeys but a type of shrimp — swarm to the surface in one large, culminatin
Can Narendra Modi bring the solar power revolution to India?
From the observation tower in the Thar desert and as far as the eye can see, the dark blue arrays of a million solar panels can be seen sitting silently on the red dust. The Charanka solar park in Gujarat is an “ultra-mega” power
Wildlife numbers plunge by 50% since 1970 – in pictures
Habitat destruction and hunting causing huge decline in wildlife population on land, in rivers and in the oceans, a new ‘Living Planet’ analysis from WWF and the Zoological Society of London reveals
Cubesats: A Space Junk Hazard?
Cubesats provide a valuable, low-cost research space platform for institutions, universities, laboratories and space agencies, but could their use create a new hazard for the increasingly crowded orbital environment? According
Patagonia catalog shows illegal climbing in Utah national park
Three rock climbers have paid a $4,000 settlement to Capitol Reef National Park in Utah for violating climbing policies in the making of a photograph that appeared in a Patagonia clothing catalog, a park official said Tuesday.
The Woman Who Walked 10,000 Miles (No Exaggeration) in Three Years
A hundred years ago, when Robert Falcon Scott set out for Antarctica on his Terra Nova expedition, his two primary goals were scientific discovery and reaching the geographic South Pole. Arguably, though, Scott was really chasing
New atlas shows canyons, lakes and mountains locked under the polar ice
Most atlases don’t bother much with the polar regions. A simple outline of the frozen landmass coloured a nice shade of white usually does the trick. But the new edition of the Times Comprehensive Atlas of the World has decided
No Single Missing Link Between Birds and Dinosaurs
Birds didn't evolve in one fell swoop from their dinosaur ancestors, suggests a newly constructed dinosaur family tree showing our feathery friends evolved very gradually, at first. Ever seen a bird penis? Chances are you haven
Solar System's Water is Older Than the Sun
Guess what Earth's been hiding from us, way down in its belly? Water! Lots and lots of water. So concludes a team of scientists who ran computer models comparing the ratios of hydrogen isotopes over time. Taking into account new i
Islamic State advance halts archaeological research in Iraqi Kurdistan
Advances by Islamic State (IS) forces have threatened one of the last safe regions of Mesopotamia still open to archaeologists by driving up the risks of working in Iraqi Kurdistan, it is feared. This month, a team of Italian arch
Barack Obama to create world's largest ocean reserve in the Pacific
Barack Obama will use his presidential powers on Thursday to create the world’s largest marine reserve in the Pacific, banning fishing and other commercial activities across vast swaths of pristine sea populated by whales, dolphin
Earthquake shakes Anchorage, Alaska, measuring 6.2 magnitude
An earthquake registering a preliminary 6.2 magnitude was centered 81 miles northwest of Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday morning, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. "It was kind of a long one," Anchorage Police spokeswoman J
Is fracking greener than solar power and wind turbines?
Is fracking greener than solar power and wind turbines? An easy one today... I don’t know. From this study it would be improper to draw a conclusion about which energy source causes less environmental damage. In the end, it’s a
India's Mars Orbiter Mission Arrives at the Red Planet
India has joined the Mars club. Could small amounts of liquid water exist on the surface of Mars? Salt may be a key to answering that question. India's Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) probe was captured by the Red Planet's gravity
Big-Nosed Dino Might Have Attracted Mates With Shnoz
A new dinosaur with a huge nose has been unearthed in Utah and now the question is: what did it do with its enormous shnoz? The dinosaur, Rhinorex condrupus aka “King Nose,” could have used its namesake body part for a variety
Bart’s Bash sets the new Guinness World Record
Bart’s Bash, the global sailing race organized by the Andrew Simpson Sailing Foundation which took place on 21st September, has set the new Guinness World Record for the Largest Sailing Race (24 hours). While the Bart’s Bash t
Scale the Rockies, no mountaineering experience required. Seriously
From where I’m hanging, on a sheer cliff face some 700 metres above the town of Banff, Alta., it’s clear that my scaling skills are about to be tested like never before. Conquering Mount Norquay’s new via ferrata “is like clim
Nelson Mandela's widow calls for urgent climate action at UN
The widow of Nelson Mandela punctured the self-congratulatory mood of the UN summit on Tuesday, saying world leaders had failed to rise to the challenge of climate change. “There is a huge mismatch between the magnitude of the
Weird Green 'Eggs' Wash Up on Sydney Beach: Photos
Australian beachgoers got a surprise this week when strange balls of living green algae started washing up on Dee Why beach in Sydney. “I did poke it with my toes and it’s squishy, like a sponge,” Surf Life Saving Club patrol memb
More Than 50 'Nazca Lines' Found in Kazakhstan
More than 50 geoglyphs with various shapes and sizes, including a massive swastika, have been discovered across northern Kazakhstan in Central Asia, say archaeologists. Powerful things can often derive from simple principles,
Cassini Admires Trio of 'Oddball' Saturn Moons
There’s no denying it, Saturn has an astonishing array of moons of different shapes, sizes and compositions. In this newly-released observation from the 10 year-old NASA Cassini mission, the orbiter managed to capture three of the
Scripps Oceanography/UC San Diego News at the Algae Biomass Summit
Scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego will be featured prominently at the upcoming Algae Biomass Summit in San Diego. The eighth annual event, Sept. 29-Oct. 2, 2014, at the San Diego Marriott Marq
Ozone Pollution in India Kills Enough Crops to Feed 94 Million in Poverty
In one year, India’s ozone pollution damaged millions of tons of the country’s major crops, causing losses of more than a billion dollars and destroying enough food to feed tens of millions of people living below the poverty line.
Heat, drought cited in massive Mount Shasta mudslide
Glaciers are not known as fast-moving objects. Yet on Saturday, things started happening very quickly at a glacier high on the slopes of Mount Shasta. At about 3 p.m. Saturday, wilderness rangers working for the Shasta-Trinity
Mapping the Mighty Britannic Shipwreck
So fascinating did the mystery of the Britannic shipwreck proved to Jacques Cousteau, he scoured the depths of the Kea coast in the hopes of finding it. Sister ship of the Titanic, the Britannic ocean liner was christened during W
« 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 »
Latest News
ARTICLE: Bouldering as Treatment for Depression - A Study
A recent study by the University of Arizona suggests that bouldering could be an effective treatment for depression in a...-UKClimbing.com Articles
A glowing invasion of 'fire bodies' is underway in the Pacific
The massive bloom of bizarre, bioluminescent pyrosomes has marine scientists completely baffled. ...-All MNN Content
James Stewart, pioneering scuba diver, dies at 89
...-UnderwaterTimes.com - SCUBA ne
The sun may have an evil twin with a flare for mass extinction
The sun, like many stars, may be a binary, meaning it could have a mass-extinction-causing 'brother.'

[C...-All MNN Content

Shark attacks spearfisherman, who captures it on video
A spearfisherman wearing a head camera captured the intense moment an 8-foot reef shark attacked him and took a bite out...-UnderwaterTimes.com - SCUBA ne
Coast Guard saves vessel from sinking in Puget Sound
The crew of the Victoria Clipper, a catamaran-style passenger vessel, was in the area and stood by in case the passenger...-The Seattle Times: Home
Yale astronomers identify new exoplanet

A Yale graduate student working in collaboration with a Yale professor and a researcher at NASA’s Ames Research Ce...-Yale Daily News - Latest Issue

Soyuz capsule docks with International Space Station
A Soyuz space capsule carrying astronauts from Russia, Japan and the United States has docked with the International Spa...-The Seattle Times: Home
Promiscuity may help some corals survive bleaching events
Researchers have shown for the first time that some corals surviving bleaching events can acquire and host new types of ...-ScienceDaily: Latest Science N
Wolf poaching: Hunters should realize that wolves help ecosystems
Much praise to Op-Ed writer Chase Gunnell for sticking up for the wolves. Here’s a standup a guy I’d rather hunt with t...-The Seattle Times
Volcanic eruptions: How bubbles lead to disaster
Why are volcanologists interested in vapor bubbles? Because they can accumulate in a magma reservoir underneath a volcan...-ScienceDaily: Latest Science N
Visit 7 national parks and monuments in Colorado for free April 16-24
More than 400 national parks and monuments — including four in Colorado — will offer free admission April 16-24 as part...-Denver Post: Outdoors
Copyright 2014 ExpeditionQuest, Inc. All rights reserved